Paw Prints Magazine is a The Pet Rescue Solution initiative ---- Number 0 ---- November, 2013        A selection of information ... cuz we care
ALERTS:

Rescues in China Raise Host of New Questions
By DIDI KIRSTEN TATLOW

BEIJING — The crazy meowing from a truck crashed on a highway outside Changsha, in central China, told rescuers this was no ordinary cargo; inside, over 1,000 cats and kittens were crammed into bamboo cages, headed for restaurant tables in the southern city of Guangzhou, Chinese media reported.
Some cats were badly injured in the nighttime accident two Sundays ago. Some were dying of thirst. Some were giving birth. Some were adopted by animal lovers who rushed to the scene, alerted by text message, telephone or microblog posts, said participants. In all, about 200 cats died; about a dozen are still in animal hospitals in Changsha, the capital of Hunan province, according to local media reports.
But in a new twist, 800 cats released by rescuers into the city are now causing a different kind of concern: how will they impact on the local environment? As well as dealing with hundreds of new, potentially fast-multiplying cats in the neighborhood, some rescuers are afraid the animals have simply escaped on5pxe fate for another and will soon be caught and sold again by the cat trappers and traders. As the Sanxiang Metropolitan News, a local newspaper, wrote, the fate of these cats is "an awkward fate."

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Getting To The "Root"
of Bad Breath In Dogs And Cats
by Dr. Donna Spector

Periodontal disease is one of the most common and serious pet health problems, affecting approximately 80% of dogs and 70% of cats by age 3. At-home prevention is as important as regular teeth cleaning by veterinarians. In fact, unless pet owners provide teeth cleaning for dogs and cats at home, periodontal disease will progress regardless of the care provided by veterinarians. Periodontal disease often results in tooth and gum infections, pain, loss of teeth and even organ damage in pets. Studies have shown that dogs with severe periodontal disease have more damage in their kidneys, heart muscle and liver than dogs without periodontal disease. This organ damage occurs when bacteria from the infected tooth roots and gums gain access to the blood stream (a condition called bacteremia). The key to management of gum disease (for humans or pets!) is prevention. As long as the surfaces of the teeth are cleaned frequently, the gums will stay healthy

Brushing your pets' teeth at home

The gold standard for keeping gums healthy and plaque controlled in pets is twice daily tooth brushing.

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The Pet RescueThe Pet Rescue with its largest network of Veterinarians, Shelters, Rescue Groups, pet services, neighborhood watch programs, pet lovers: over 11,000 participants, is providing unique nationwide support for lost pets families: the combined effort, is making the difference. Over 5 million pets are lost every year in the US: more than 15,000 per day: probably we are not able to save all of them but surely we will make a difference in the life of those that we help to get back home!

Dog Bladder Stones
(aka uroliths, cystic calculi)
by Dr. Donna Spector

Many types of bladder stones affect dogs and cats. The most common stones are struvite, calcium oxalate and urate. Each of these stones form under different medical circumstances and some breeds are genetically predisposed to the development of particular stone types. How bladder stones form. All bladder stones are formed from the presence of excess minerals in the urine. These minerals first appear as crystals suspended in the urine. Eventually as the concentration of crystals increases, they fall out of suspension and create bladder "sand". Over time, this sand becomes full-fledged stones. Treatment of dog bladder stones. The treatment of bladder stones varies depending on the type of stone present. Often your veterinarian will recommend surgery, prescription diet therapy and sometimes medication. Your pet may require long term treatment because "once a stone former, always a stone former". The best treatment is prevention and there are several things you can do to lessen the risk of your pet developing bladder stones. Prevention of bladder stones Increase water consumption.

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Feline Diabetes:
A New Look at an Old Disease
by Dr. Donna Spector

Diabetes Mellitus (diabetes) is a disorder in which the body is unable to regulate blood sugar levels due to a lack of insulin or insulin action. Insulin is a hormone required to move sugar into body cells where it is used for energy. Without this energy, the cells of the body starve, shut down and eventually die, which leads to multiple complications. There are two forms of diabetes which affect cats. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes, insulin is produced but the body does not respond properly to it. Type 2 diabetes is also called "insulin resistance" and is the most common form of diabetes in cats and people. Just as for people, there has been a tremendous increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in cats over the last 30 years. Diabetes now affects one out of every 100 cats—approximately 800,000 cats in the U.S. Pet Obesity often leads to Feline diabetes and results from indoor confinement, decreased physical activity and feeding high carbohydrate foods. Read on to learn more about your cat's dietary requirements and how high-quality, natural cat food like Halo® may help the health of your cat.

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Fun Facts About Pets
Tidbits of Trivia You Might Not Have Known

Domesticated pets are complex creatures. Have you ever wondered why they do some of the things they do? Your cat seems smart, but how sharp is his memory? Why is it your dog can always outrun you? Is it your imagination, or does it seem like your bird is always eating? Here are some interesting facts bound to keep you guessing.

Fun Facts About Dogs
• Dogs only sweat from the bottoms of their feet, the only way they can discharge heat is by panting.
• Dogs have about 100 different facial expressions, most of them made with the ears.
• Dogs have about 10 vocal sounds.
• Dogs do not have an appendix.
• There are more than 350 different breeds of dogs worldwide.
• Dalmatians are born spotless: at first pure white, their spots develop as they age.
• Contrary to popular belief, dogs aren't color blind; they can see shades of blue, yellow, green and gray.

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Dogs and Chocolate
An Indulgence to Humans, Toxic to Dogs


Let's face it. Most people tend to have a little chocolate tucked somewhere around the house. What many people don't realize is that if their pup gets his paws on this rich treat it can trigger a number of toxic reactions including possible death. "Approximately 97 percent of the cases involving chocolate toxicity are associated with dogs," says Dr. Justine Lee, associate director of veterinary services and emergency critical care specialist at Pet Poison Helpline, as "cats have a much more discriminating non-chocolate palate." Whether you live in a dog or cat household, it's important to lock up chocolate safely in secured kitchen cabinets. This includes Halloween and Easter candy, along with less obvious sources like chocolate-flavored chewable, daily vitamins. When baking, make sure to keep chocolate chips and baking ingredients out of reach until immediate use; once you're done making the treats, store them safely out of reach (like hidden away in the microwave). Prevention is always key when it comes to tasty chocolate! Level of Toxicity Different types of chocolate contain various levels of fat, caffeine and the substances methylxanthines.

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The Pet RescueOur PREMIUM SERVICE    We take an active role in finding your pet: Time is the Essence! We don't simply have an automatically uploaded ad, we manually post it. We contact you if there is missing data and we follow through with our professional pet contacts in an area of 75 miles radius. Your ad will be on line until the pet is found, complete with photographs and videos provided by you.

Pets and People Battle Obesity
Owners and Pets Who Exercise Together Lose Weight Faster


You and your dog love nothing more than lying on the couch together and watching TV. Maybe you have a few snacks – and share those crunchy chips with Fido. Then you start noticing that you can't see your dog's ribs through a new layer of chub. He's walking a little slower and seems more tired than usual. You realize your dog might be overweight. You take him to the veterinarian for a checkup, and learn that your dog is part of the growing pet obesity problem. In fact, a 2005 study from Purina found that 60 percent of pets are overweight. Your veterinarian recommends adjusting your dog's diet – including cutting out the people food – and says you need to start taking your dog for brisk walks, twice a day. Fight Obesity Together Obesity is a major health issue in Americans. Childhood obesity is considered an epidemic. As we struggle with obesity, so do our pets. They have the same weight-related issues we do: diabetes, heart problems, joint issues and cancer. And, just like us, many of these health problems for our pets can be alleviated through a healthy diet and regular exercise. Take your dog for brisk walks of at least 20 minutes twice a day and you both benefit. It is a great time to get your heart pumping and to spend time out of doors. You and your dog can get fit together while also reducing stress. Getting your dog out and taking him different places helps keep his mind alert and active. You can gradually build up to longer walks or even runs.

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Most Popular Pet Names
Tips for Choosing the Perfect Pet Name


What you name your pet says a lot about you as an individual, and with hundreds of thousands of names from which to choose, finding the ideal name for your new fuzzy friend can be overwhelming. "Max" Is Tops For Dogs and Cats The good news is there are many popular pet names to choose from. A recent analysis of Veterinary Pet Insurance's (VPI) 450,000 insured pets revealed that "Max" is the most popular name for both cats and dogs. Molly, Buddy, Bella and Lucy rounded out the top five most popular names for dogs, and Chloe, Lucy, Tigger and Tiger rounded out the top five most popular names for cats. The majority of these names are a far cry from once traditional pet names such as Rover and Fluffy. Pet naming trends are reflecting the humanization of pets as the emotional connection between owners and their animals continues to grow.

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Why I believe the only way you can help dogs,
is to help people


Hi! My name is Nico Joiner. I am the Training and Behaviour advisor (TBA) at Dogs Trust Loughborough. I started here back in April in the portacabins (before the centre was finished!) with the rest of the management team. However my dog experience started at my nan's rescue shelter when I was around 7 years old. I spent term times with Auntie Rita and my partner in crime Wilhelmina the foxhound, hosing down Merlin's compound - he was the pot bellied pig.
My nan handed the site over to what was then NCDL in 1999. I then returned for work experience when I was 15 and the next 7 years moved on like this:
• Two weeks work experience turned in to 7 weeks!
• My work placement soon became 2 ½ years of volunteering,
• Volunteering became a full time canine carer role at Dogs Trust Canterbury and I was there for 5 ½ years before the big move to the Midlands. And now I'm here on this blog, taking this opportunity to explain a theory I have learnt the importance of since working with dogs: prevention is always better than cure. In my new role I have the responsibility to put this theory into practice by training the team and helping to get new protocols and procedures in place. It might sound a bit formal but having measures in place allows us to prevent problems, which is so important as the dogs rely on us. The early signs of a potential problem can be so subtle. A skill that's taken me years to acquire and, as dogs do, one that I keep learning more about every day .

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Microchip Identification in Dogs

“So, on those microchips, what kind of range do they have?”   About three inches.  When people don’t really understand what microchip identification is, they can have some unrealistic expectations.
Look at this little thing: do you see any room for a power supply?  I mean, I’ve heard of the “button battery”, but you’d have to have the “grain of millet” battery.  The whole thing is no bigger than a grain of rice.  There’s just no way you could track it from the black helicopters.
There are GPS tracking collars, but the units are as big as a deck of cards.  It just wouldn’t be practical to implant them under the skin. 
The microchips used for animal identification aren’t big enough to accommodate a power supply, so they can be easily injected through a needle.  No sedation is required.  If a dog will accept an injection with the smaller needles usually used for vaccinations, they usually don’t flinch (even though a 14-gauge needle looks big enough to scare superman – ask folks who have them inserted for dialysis treatments).
What you have, then, is an “identification tag” that cannot be lost, or seen, either, for that matter. Since the microchip is invisible, I always recommend that the pet wear an I.D. tag. 

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The Pet RescueFor a small extra charge, we can set a FaceBook page dedicated to the lost pet including a video created by our staff based on the pet pictures and description. The video will be also included in the picture's page in the web site ad. The dedicated FaceBook page will be present for 180 days. See a sample of the FB page with video here:

Green cleaning for humans can still sicken pets
By SUE MANNING Associated Press


LOS ANGELES—As the time nears for spring cleaning and companies offer more environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic cleaners, veterinarians say pet owners should keep in mind that what's green to a human can be dangerous—even deadly—to animals. "People expose their animals without even realizing the risk," said Dr. Karl Jandrey, who works in the emergency and critical care units at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California, Davis. "That's the most common thing that happens when you come to our emergency room—the clients put their pets at risk because they were unaware of how significant the damage could be." Most household cleaners are safe if used as directed on labels, but pet owners who make their own cleansers using natural ingredients don't have the warnings or instructions that come with commercial products. Cats, for example, can get stomachaches from essential oils added for orange, lemon or peppermint scents in cleaners, said Dr. Camille DeClementi, a senior toxicologist at the Animal Poison Control Center run by the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Urbana, Ill. Most commercial green products are safe for animals, DeClementi said, but owners should still exercise the same precautions as with chemical alternatives, such as keeping pets away from an area being cleaned, not using sprays directly on a pet and making sure that dogs don't chew on the products. If a product says "Keep out of reach of children," keep it away from pets too, DeClementi said. Caroline Golon, an Ohio mother of two children under 5 and owner of two Persian cats, said she became concerned about cleaning products before her children were born, when she noticed how often the cats jumped between floors and counters.

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